Where in the World Is That Statue?

By: Tasha Moore
Image: joe daniel price/Moment/Getty Images

About This Quiz

The statues of the world are worthy of your prompt attention! We invite you to share your understanding of sculpted manifestations of the human imagination. Confirm that you know the exact locations of the statues we present on this global challenge.

Humans have always had the need to crane their necks while viewing larger-than-life entities, whether natural or unnatural. The tallest statues are reserved for big ideas, celebrated heroes and revered deities. The most recognizable Buddha and Jesus statues are huge; the artists who conceive their likenesses understand that believers wouldn't accept the coveted images at anything less than large-scale. Grand-sized works also speak to human ingenuity, reminding us that, at the very least, humans can attempt to accomplish the impossible through artistic expression.

Statues that represent human aspirations are often designed in a classical style, recalling a time when anything less than perfect was unthinkable. Detroit's "Spirit of Detroit" statue and New York City's "Atlas" rendition at Rockefeller Center both feature classically proportioned figures holding orbs, which represent a sound, yet intangible ideal or set of ideas. It's also reassuring to see our collective hopes represented sculpturally with such symmetrical perfection!

It's your turn to carve out the perfect answers. Identify the easy-to-guess locations of the world's most recognizable statues! 

Sardar Patel, or Vallabhbhai Patel, helped to establish modern-day India by politically integrating 565 states. The 597-foot-tall statue of his likeness is located in Gujarat at Kevadia.

The gold-plated, 169-foot-tall "Great Buddha Dordenma" statue in Bhutan hosts 125,000 smaller gilded Buddha statues, ranging in height between 8 and 12 inches, in its base. The massive $100 million statue was completed in 2015.

Built in Oruro, Bolivia, "Virgen del Socavon," or "Virgin of Oruro," stands 148 feet tall. "Virgen del Socavon," which is translated "Virgin of the Mineshaft," is the name that miners of Oruro gave the statue.

Rio De Janeiro's "Christ the Redeemer" statue was built in 1931 and receives an estimated 700,000 tourists each year. The statue has incurred damage from one or more lightning bolts.

"Qianshou Qianyan Guanyin of Weishan" is a gilded bronze statue that took the government of China nearly six years to erect. The numerous faces of the 325-foot-tall statue are said to represent the Goddess's worldly blessings.

Spanish artist Agustin de la Herran Matorras crafted the 148-foot "Virgen Del Panecillo" statue, which is named for the hill on which it towers. Completed in 1976, the work of art is comprised of 7,000 aluminum pieces.

Indonesia's Garuda Wisnu Kencana statue sits in the cultural park of the same name and looks over Bali's Jimbaran Beach, a place that draws many tourists every year. The statue depicts the Hindu god Wisnu and the fabled Garuda bird.

Japan's "Awaji Kannon" statue is 263 meters tall and depicts the Buddhist goddess Guanyin. The sacred structure overlooks Awaji Island in Hyogo Prefecture. When the structure was completed in 1982, it was one of the world's tallest statues.

The 142-foot Lord Murugan statue depicts the son of Hindu Goddess Parvati. The golden structure sits on a foundation that measures 40 feet deep. A steep staircase leading to a small cavernous temple is located behind the statue.

In the early 19th century, Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon fought for Mexican independence from Spain. He incited indigenous independence movements by preaching the virtues of the Virgin of Guadalupe.

Standing tall on a hillside in front of the parliament building in Ulan Bator is the equestrian statue of Genghis Khan. In Mongolia, the leader's name is spelled Chinggis Khaan. Mongolians believe that Genghis Khan represents peace and economic prosperity.

The island of Puerto Rico is home to a massive creation of artist Zurab Tsereteli. The structure was erected in 1995 to commemorate Columbus's alleged second voyage in 1493 to the New World island, which was then called Boriken.

The 279-foot "Rodina-Mat' Zovyot!," or "The Motherland Calls," statue is the world's tallest statue depicting a female. Russia's towering structure stands twice as tall as the Statue of Liberty in New York City.

Dakar's 161-foot statue "African Renaissance Monument" portrays a family rising from a mountaintop. Senegalese architect Pierre Goudiaby Atepa designed the monument, which was constructed by the North Korean firm Mansudae Overseas Project Group of Companies.

Visitors of "The Merlion of Sentosa" can view the Singapore skyline from the eyes or gaping mouth of the half-lion-half-fish (mermaid) Merlion statue. The 121-foot-tall mythical creature towers over the 1,230-acre southern Singapore resort island of Sentosa.

The sculpted face of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, who established modern-day Turkey, gazes at the Aegean Sea. Ataturk defeated Greek invaders on September 9, 1922, and their warships retreated by way of the same sea.

Weighing 560 tons, Kiev's "Motherland Monument" stands 203 feet tall. The statue's right-hand sword weighs 9 tons, and the left hand holds a 43-by-26-foot shield that shows the State Emblem of the Soviet Union.

Sculptor Andy Scott designed "The Kelpies" which is a 98-foot sculpture in Falkirk. The glistening horse heads dominate the landscape at the opening of the Forth and Clyde Canal in Scotland.

The 473-ton "Pegasus and Dragon" statue of Hallandale Beach, Florida is a sculpted depicted of the struggle of good against evil. Pegasus is a winged statue of Greek lore. The $30 million bronze structure guards the entrance of Gulfstream Park.

The "Burke and Wills Monument" is one of Melbourne's most controversial public art pieces. The statue commemorates the journey of the two explorers who attempted to cross Australia's interior.

Rockefeller Center's "Atlas" statue is directly across from St. Patrick's Cathedral on Fifth Avenue in New York City. As the Greek legend goes, Altas and his comrades, the Titans, loss a battle with Zeus for control of the universe.

"Butte du Lion," or "Lion Mound," stands on an artificial hill that overlooks the battlefield where the Prince of Orange was wounded during the 1815 Battle of Waterloo. The 147-foot statue and battlefield are near Brussels.

Sculptor Miguel Joyal created a stately image of Louis Riel in a bronze statue that stands behind the Manitoba Legislative Building. After much protest, Joyal's work replaced Marcien Lemay's tortured and naked portrayal of Manitoba's "father," in 1994.

Built in the first century B.C. by Ramses II, Abu Simbel, as well as Nefertari's tomb, overlook Lake Nasser. The temple was moved to its current location after the Aswan Dam was constructed.

Master sculptor Auguste Rodin presented "The Burghers of Calais" in 1895. The artwork commemorates six 14th-century town council members who offered themselves as ransom in order to save their city.

The 66-foot aluminum "Kartlis Deda" statue is "Mother Georgia" who holds a sword for enemies in one hand and a cup of wine for her friends in the other. Built in 1958, "Kartlis Deda" watches over the old town of Tbilisi.

Berlin's "Victory Column" stands tall over Tiergarten Park and is surrounded by 250 symmetrical beams. Former U.S. President Barack Obama gave a memorable address at the 226-foot-tall statue in 2008.

Swedish artist Carl Milles presented "Vision of Peace" on May 28, 1936. There are five Indian characters around a campfire at the base of the structure, which is made of Mexican onyx.

"Thiruvalluvar Statue" honors the philosopher and poet of Tamil Nadu. Posted on a rock where the Arabian Sea, the Indian Ocean and the Bay of Bengal converge, the structure erected at the site was initially supposed to be a metal statue similar to New York's Statue of Liberty.

"Apollo Belvedere," along with other classical works were discovered during the great building projects of the Rome Renaissance. The statue was restored to its former condition and later imitated by some of the region's greatest artists.

The elaborate equestrian statue honors Serbia's Prince Mihailo of the 19th century. During Prince Mihailo's reign, Serbia issued copper money to establish the nation's national monetary system.

Nobel Peace Prize recipient Hjalmar Branting is remembered in sculptor Carl Eldh's "The Branting Monument." Branting was Sweden's first Social Democratic prime minister. Other famous works by Eldh include "Strindberg" and "Engelbrekt."

Renowned artist Lorado Taft sculpted the "Black Hawk Statue," which located north of Oregon, Illinois, out of concrete. Black Hawk lead his Sauk Indian tribe on a crusade against the early settlers of the 1800s.

Indiana's "Soldiers and Sailors Monument" was dedicated in 1910 and the ground at Clinton Square where it stands was broken in 1909. Nearly 50,000 people attended the dedication ceremony.

Faith is the focus of the "National Monument to the Forefathers" in Massachusetts. The 81-foot-high monument features a sculpted interpretation of the virtue, which ascends 36 feet off of the statue's 45-foot foundation.

This "Washington Monument" stands tall in the Baltimore City neighborhood of Mount Vernon. Completed in November 1829, the sculpture of George Washington is the oldest in the United States.

Posted in front of the Coleman A. Young Municipal Center in downtown Detroit is "The Spirit of Detroit" statue, designed by sculptor Marshall M. Fredericks. The people of Detroit named the bronze creation, which was installed in 1958.

Minnesota's "Iron Man" statue includes an inscription that reads: "They toiled with purpose, these miners of ours ..." The commemorative statue of the Mesabi Iron Range is also referred to as "Tin Man."

"Tyler Davidson Fountain" has existed since 1871. The downtown Cincinnati water fountain was built in Germany before it was donated by Cincinnati businessman Henry Probasco to memorialize his late brother-in-law, Tyler Davidson.

"Pioneer Woman" is housed on the grounds of Ponca City, Oklahoma's Pioneer Woman Museum. Sculptor Bryant Baker crafted the 30-foot-tall bronze structure depicting a young woman gripping a Bible in her right hand and her son's hand in her left hand.

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