Can You Name the Disney Movie From the Emojis?

ENTERTAINMENT

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By: Jacqueline Samaroo

7 Min Quiz

Image: A Little Mouse Told Me via YouTube

About This Quiz

Pictures are worth a thousand words, so you should have no problem figuring out what these emojis are saying!

When it comes to movies, few other film companies can hope to even match Disney. With almost 100 years of history and experience under its belt, it is no surprise that more than a few films that have been produced by Disney rank as some of the most popular and successful movies of all time. 

However, Disney-produced films aren't just popular and eye-catching; from a technical standpoint Disney has been one of the leading innovators in the film industry. This fact is especially true when it comes to their animated feature-length productions like Pinocchio, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, The Lion King, Toy Story and Up.

We all know this quiz would be too easy if we just showed you a picture of the movie, so let's see if you can solve all of our Disney movie emoji puzzles! With several decades' worth of popular and successful films to choose from, this quiz is bound to bring back fond childhood memories (whether from the living room couch or from popcorn-scented theaters) for anyone, no matter how young or old you may be!

Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Following a series of commercial and/or critical Disney movie failures starting in the 1970s, The Little Mermaid is known for starting the “Disney Renaissance”. This era was marked by Disney returning to animated films with catchy musical sequences and being based on well-known stories and folklore.

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

The character Winnie The Pooh was created by A.A. Milne and was both inspired by and named after a teddy bear owned by his son, Christopher. Some of Christopher’s other stuffed animals – such as Piglet, Tigger, Eeyore, Kanga and Roo – also became characters in Milne’s stories (and later Disney’s movies.)

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

As expected from a movie based on video games, Wreck-It Ralph features cameos from lots of popular video game characters! These cameos include Chun-Li from Street Fighter, Doctor Eggman from Sonic The Hedgehog, Bowser from the Mario franchise, and several Pac-Man characters.

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

The hilarious Genie was written specifically to be played by Robin Williams and, when he at first refused the part, the directors had the supervising animator, Eric Goldberg, animate the Genie performing William’s stand-up comedy routines. Williams, of course, found the effort remarkable and the result hilarious, and signed on to voice the comedic character.

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

In this movie, main character Carl dreams of going to the South American (fictional) Paradise Falls and does eventually get there! But did you know that the film’s director, along with 11 artists from Pixar Studios, actually visited Venezuela for three days for research and inspiration?

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

This “Cars” spin-off was originally set to be the first in a trilogy of films (just as with the Cars trilogy) but only "Planes" and its sequel, "Planes: Fire And Rescue" (2014), have been released so far. The production team of the film personally met with and interviewed pilots of the different plane types featured in the movie.

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

The title of this movie was originally going to be “Rapunzel”, but was later changed to “Tangled” to appeal to a more diverse audience (i.e., more than just young girls). It was also changed to highlight the fact that the film was not only centered on Rapunzel but also on the film’s male star, Flynn Rider, who has a story of his own.

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

The Jungle Book was inspired by a collection of books by Rudyard Kipling, though Walt Disney changed the screenplay to be less dark and sinister than the original work. Sadly, this iconic film was the last one produced by Walt Disney himself, as he died before it was released. However, upon its release, The Jungle Book became Disney’s second highest-grossing film in North America!

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Pinocchio is the 2nd feature film ever produced by Disney, following Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937). This 1940 adaption of the Italian children’s novel was considered to be a pioneer in effects animation at the time. Pinocchio was meant to be Disney’s third movie, but its intended predecessor Bambi was put on hold because of difficulties in animating the latter’s animals.

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

The Pirates of the Caribbean series was based on the ride attraction of the same name in several Disney theme parks, the first of which opened in 1967 (and was the last ride construction overseen by Walt Disney before his death). The series also allegedly drew inspiration from the video game series “Monkey Island.”

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Can you believe it took Walt Disney 15 years to convince P.L. Travers (author of the Mary Poppins book series) to allow him to produce a film based on her books, and she wasn’t pleased with the finished product? However, Mary Poppins is Walt Disney’s only movie he produced to be nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars and is one of the production company’s most critically acclaimed films to date!

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Dumbo was purposefully less detailed than Disney’s 3 previous animated movies (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Pinocchio and Fantasia) in order to be simple and to cut down costs. In fact, it cost only half of what Snow White took to produce. Surprisingly, Dumbo ended up being Disney’s most successful film of the 1940s!

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Perhaps the most iconic and critically acclaimed of all Disney classics, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was the very first Disney film released! Having been re-released in theaters multiple times since its original release, Snow White is the overall 10th highest grossing box office film in North America (when adjusted for inflation.)

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Based on the popular children’s novel by Roald Dahl, James and the Giant Peach is widely known (and loved) for its unusual style of being partially live-action and partially stop-motion animation. Director Henry Selick was undecided for a long time as to whether to make the film live-action or animated, and eventually just decided to do both!

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Did you know that Toy story is Pixar’s first feature film? It sure lives up to its legacy! Regarded by many as one of the best animated films of all time, Toy Story not only became the highest-grossing film in its opening weekend, but also gained 3 Academy Award nominations and was even added to the United States National Film Registry!

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Following Walt Disney’s failed attempts of Beauty and the Beast adaptations in the 1930s and 1950s, the production company decided to finally go through with the film after the success of The Little Mermaid. Beauty and the Beast was the first animated film to ever win a Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture, and also the first to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture.

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

This beloved holiday film is actually the 2nd out of 4 collaborations between director John Pasquin and lead actor Tim Allen. They were a part of 2 movies together as well as a television series. Did you know that Allen had to gain 45 pounds for the role of Santa? He did it by sticking to Santa’s diet of cookies and milk!

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Despite controversy surrounding the film’s similarity to DreamWorks’ film “Antz” which was also released in 1998, A Bug’s Life was a box office success and received largely positive reviews. A Bug’s Life is based on the fable “The Ant and the Grasshopper” but isn’t Disney’s first adaptation; Walt Disney himself had produced an adaptation in 1934 in the form of the short film “The Grasshopper and the Ants.”

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

As surprising as it may seem, Lady and the Tramp was first conceptualized in 1937 around Disney story man Joe Grant’s Spaniel named Lady. Up until the early 40s, the production team worked on several approaches to the film, but Walt didn’t approve of any of them. However, when Disney read the short story “Happy Dan, The Whistling Dog” and acquired the rights, he had the film based more on this.

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

The Princess and the Frog was Disney’s first traditionally animated film since 2004, and also marked the Disney return of directors John Musker and Ron Clemonts who had directed both The Little Mermaid and Aladdin. As such, the film drew much inspiration from and was made in a similar musical film format to many Disney classics.

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

In preparation for the making of the film, the crew went to Paris to gain inspiration and meet with French chefs. Director Brad Bird even interned at a French restaurant and included the dish “confit byaldi” in the movie, a variation of traditional ratatouille developed by the restaurant’s owner. All their efforts paid off, as Ratatouille won the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature!

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Despite being her first movie as lead character (and first speaking role), Tinker Bell has been featured in Peter Pan (1904) by J.M. Barrie, and then in 1953 and 2002 films by Disney. Things didn’t go too smoothly for Tinker Bell’s debut though; the movie underwent many director changes and over a dozen script changes, and was originally intended to be released in 2007!

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Directors Ron Clemonts and John Musker specifically wanted the characters to be voiced by people with Polynesian heritage, to stay true to the film’s setting. Most of the cast indeed fit the bill, including Nicole Scherzinger, Dwayne Johnson and Auli’I Cravalho. Cravalho was just a regular student when she auditioned for the role of Moana, and was the last person to audition out of hundreds!

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Disney began production of Cinderella in 1948 following box office failures of 3 previous films due to World War II, which left Walt Disney Productions in debt and on the verge of bankruptcy. This quintessential princess film became a huge box office and critical hit and the most successful of Disney’s films since 1937’s Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, successfully saving the studio!

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Did you know that it took 5 years, along with 700 animators and technicians, to complete Mulan? The hard work paid off though, as Mulan became a commercial and critical success. The crew had a whopping 1,630 pounds of coffee throughout filming! Perhaps as acknowledgement for their efforts, members of the Mulan production team make several cameos throughout the film.

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Despite this film being only a moderate success in the box office (earning $39 million on a $10 million budget) and receiving mixed reviews, its 2016 reboot faced better luck. The reboot of the film changes the story somewhat; rather than Pete being an orphan living with an abusive family, he is an orphaned feral child living in the Pacific Northwest.

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

The Lion King is undoubtedly one of Disney’s most successful and loved films and is the highest-grossing traditional animated film ever! It even garnered 2 Academy Awards and a Golden Globe Award, and has spawned several sequels and spin-offs. The Lion King was also the first Disney movie to be completely original, not based on an existing work.

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

The character WALL-E has lots of quirks you may not know of. For example, the design team decided to not give him elbows because they thought that, as a robot, they would make it too easy for him to express himself (and since he’s a trash compactor robot he doesn’t particularly need elbows.) Also, WALL-E was actually “voiced” by the same person who voiced R2-D2: sound designer Ben Burtt!

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Frozen was based on the fairy tale “The Snow Queen” by Hans Christian Anderson. Walt Disney had wanted to make a film based on the tale since the 1940s! Disney pays homage to Anderson through the names of some of the characters; Hans, Kristoff, Anna and Sven.

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Director John Lasseter, as part of his research for the film, took actual racing lessons at Infineon Raceway in California. A team working on the film went on a road-trip of Route 66 for inspiration as well (Cars' tentative title was “Route 66”). Car enthusiasts among the film's viewers will probably notice that the car named Lizzie in the film is a reference to the 1913 Ford “Tin Lizzie," the first mass-produced car!

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Considering the success of the 1941 Disney film Dumbo, which was purposefully made simple to cut costs yet ended up hugely popular, Disney decided to create another movie in that economical style. Lilo & Stitch was the first Disney film since Dumbo to feature watercolour-painted backgrounds! It’s also the first animated feature film to be set in Hawaii.

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Bolt may only have been a moderate success in the box office, but it became so loved and critically acclaimed that it’s considered to be the pioneer of the “Disney Revival," setting the studio on the path of creatively similar hits such as Tangled, Brave and Frozen. It was also the first computer-animated film to use non-photorealistic rendering.

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Alice In Wonderland is one of those films that were simply ahead of their time, as it was negatively reviewed by critics upon release but later became regarded as a unique and irreplaceable Disney classic! Disney had planned to make the film a mix of live-action and animation, but later decided that only the latter would do the original tale justice (though a live-action adaptation was also produced by Walt Disney Productions in 2010.)

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Walt Disney’s desire to create an animated adaptation of the Peter Pan story stems from his own childhood; he played the role of Peter Pan in a school play! A lot of work went into the creation of Disney’s Peter Pan, as a live-action version was filmed in its entirety to serve as a reference for the animators (and the actress who played Tinker Bell had to pretend to fly for each of Tinker Bell's flying scenes!)

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Finding Nemo was inspired by director Andrew Stanton’s overprotective nature toward his then-young son, which he compares to Marlin’s overprotectiveness toward Nemo. In fact, Stanton was so inspired that he wrote the entire script before he received the green light from his higher-ups! When he actually did pitch the idea though, Pixar’s creative officer, John Lasseter, simply said: “You had me at ‘fish.’”

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Based on the 1883 novel by Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island was Walt Disney Productions' first fully live-action film. Robert Newton, who played the pirate Long John Silver, reprised his role in a 1954 non-Disney sequel of Treasure Island, and then once again in the television series “The Adventures of Long John Silver.”

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Tim Burton’s inspiration for The Nightmare Before Christmas came from childhood memories of seeing Halloween and Christmas decorations sold around the same time during fall and winter. It’s also a common misconception that Burton was the film’s director (the film’s alternative title is even “Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas”) but he’s actually the producer!

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Ever wondered how the idea of a Baymax being such a huggable robot came about? When they went for research at the Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute, a professor showed the animators an inflatable vinyl arm under development for health care needs. Another part of Baymax’s adorableness comes from the fact that his motions were modeled after baby penguins!

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Surprisingly, Sleeping Beauty was quite the box office bomb and led Walt Disney Productions to hold off on making princess films for a while until The Little Mermaid 30 years later (a film which ushered in Disney’s “Renaisssance.”) Some versions of the original Sleeping Beauty fairy tale call the heroine Aurora, while others refer to her as Briar Rose; Disney decided to make it simple and just use both!

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Which Disney movie do these emojis describe?

Bambi was perhaps one of the most difficult traditionally-animated Disney movies, because the artists had to make sure that in every frame, each spot on Bambi’s back was perfectly replicated! It also was the first Disney animated feature that utilized an oil painting technique rather than watercolor, so the artists who had worked only in the latter had to learn from those who knew how to use oil paint.

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