Can You Name All These Famous MLB Players From the 2000s?

By: J.P. Naomi
Image: Wiki Commons by Arturo Pardavila III

About This Quiz

It's the bottom of the ninth. The score is tied and well, whaddya know, "Who's on first, What's on second, I Don't Know's on third." Do you think we have a chance?


It's time for you to kick the confusion to the curb and knock this quiz out of the park! It seems like the 2000s just got here, but it's almost 2020, so we're about to take you on a trip down memory lane. Remember the Curse of the Bambino? Well, the Red Sox broke that in 2004. The 86-year dry spell came to a crashing halt and has been pretty hard to stop! Did you know the Red Sox won just as many World Series in the 2000s as the New York Yankees did during the same period of time? Guess there always was a reason for that rivalry, huh? 

The turn of the century saw many great players. Indeed there were many great Red Sox and Yankees players, like Johnny Damon, Nomar Garciaparra and Alex Rodriguez, but other greats like Greg Maddux, Chipper Jones and Vladimir Guerrero came from the Atlanta Braves, Chicago Cubs and Baltimore Orioles. The 2000s have seen home run records broken and countless Gold Glove and Silver Slugger awards distributed. Do you have what it takes to recognize the great players who have taken the field during this time? 

The time has come to put your skills to the test. Come out of the dugout and into the batter's box. Here's the wind-up. Do you think you can hit a home run with this quiz? Good luck! 






José Alberto Pujols Alcántara, AKA Albert Pujols, is a current member of the Los Angeles Angels. Prior to that, he played 11 years throughout the 2000s with the St. Louis Cardinals. During that decade alone, he was named an All-Star nine times.

Despite his involvement in the BALCO (Bay Area Laboratory Cooperative) scandal surrounding performance-enhancing drugs, Barry Bonds is widely considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time. A seven-time MVP, he holds the MLB record for career home runs with 762 and home runs in a single season with 73.

Though he started his career with the Seattle Mariners and played a short stint with the Texas Rangers, A-Rod's name is synonymous with the New York Yankees. He played with the Yankees from 2004-2013 and again from 2015-2016. A three-time AL MVP, A-Rod won the World Series with the team in 2009.

Born in Panama City, Panama, Mariano Rivera played his entire 19-year career with the New York Yankees. As a relief pitcher, mainly a closer, Rivera was a 13-time All-Star and five-time World Series champion. With a record of 82-60, his No. 42 was retired by the Yankees in 2013.

Ichiro Suzuki not only played professionally in Major League Baseball, he also played in the Nippon Professional Baseball league of his native country, Japan. He was a 10-time All-Star and the recipient of the 2001 AL MVP and AL Rookie of the Year awards.

Derek Jeter was the captain of the New York Yankees from 2003-2014. Throughout his career, he recorded 3,465 hits and a batting average of .310. Known as "Captain Clutch" and "Mr. November," Jeter's No. 2 was retired by the Yankees in 2017.

Randy Johnson, AKA "The Big Unit," was one of the tallest players in MLB history. Standing 6 feet, 10 inches tall, he pitched for the Arizona Diamondbacks during the early 2000s. With a career win-loss record of 303-166, Johnson was the World Series MVP in 2001 and a nine-time MLB strikeout leader.

Carlos Beltran made his MLB debut in 1998 with the Kansas City Royals. He played with seven different teams throughout his career, finally winning the World Series with the Houston Astros in 2017. Beltran is one of the most successful post-season MLB players with a 100% stolen base record, 11 for 11.

Manny Ramirez played 19 seasons in the MLB, the most rewarding of which were in the 2000s with the Boston Red Sox. He won the World Series with the team in 2004 and 2007 and was named World Series MVP in 2004. He was also the AL batting champion in 2002 and AL home run leader in 2004.

Roger Clemens is a member of the MLB All-Century Team, a list of 100 baseball greats from the past and present. He was also inducted into the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame. After 24 seasons on the mound, Clemens retired with a 354-184 record, including 4,672 strikeouts and seven Cy Young Awards.

David Ortiz not only played baseball in high school, he also played basketball. Ortiz made his MLB debut for the Minnesota Twins in 1997. By 2003, he was a clutch member of the Boston Red Sox. He helped lead the team to World Series championships in 2004, 2007 and 2013.

Chipper Jones played his entire career with the Atlanta Braves from 1993 - 2012. Throughout the 2000s, he was a frequent All-Star, winner of the Silver Slugger Award and MLB batting champion. The Braves retired his No. 10 in 2013, and he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2018.

Vladimir Guerrero was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2018. During his 16-season career in Major League Baseball, he recorded a batting average of .318, 2,590 hits and 449 home runs. His love for hitting "bad balls" made him a fearful threat to opposing pitchers.

Though he played with six different teams during his 22 seasons, Jim Thome made the most significant and lasting impression while playing with the Cleveland Indians from 1991 - 2002, with a brief encore in 2011. A five-time All-Star, he was the NL home run leader in 2003. He retired in 2012 with 612 career home runs.

What was the year of Andruw Jones? All signs point to 2005. In 2005, Jones was not only an All-Star, he was the Silver Slugger Award winner, Hank Aaron Award winner, MLB home run leader and NL RBI leader. Not bad, eh?

Harry Leroy Halladay III was born in Denver, Colorado, in 1977 and died in a plane crash in 2017. During his time in Major League Baseball, he pitched for the Toronto Blue Jays and Philadelphia Phillies. On May 29, 2010, Halladay recorded the 20th perfect game in MLB history.

C.C. Sabathia began his career with the Cleveland Indians in 2001. After a short stint with the Milwaukee Brewers in 2008, he signed with the New York Yankees and led them to a World Series championship in 2009. He was the MLB wins leader in 2009 and 2010.

Born in Venezuela, Bobby Abreu spent 18 years in the MLB, playing with the Astros, Phillies, Yankees, Angels, Dodgers and Mets. A frequent All-Star, he was the Philadelphia Phillies' Player of the Year three consecutive years, from 1999-2001.

Jorge Posada was a catcher for the New York Yankees from 1995-2011. Throughout his career, he was a five-time All-Star, five-time Silver Slugger winner, and he helped lead the Yankees to four World Series championships. His No. 20 was retired by the Yankees in 2015.

Miguel Cabrera signed with the Florida Marlins in 1999 and made his MLB debut in 2003. In his first year, he helped lead the Marlins in a successful run for the World Series championship. In 2008, he was traded to the Detroit Tigers where he finished off the year as the AL home run leader.

Nomar Garciaparra spent the majority of his MLB career with the Boston Red Sox. He is the only player to have ever hit two grand slams in a single game at Fenway Park. Throughout the 2000s, he was selected as an All-Star four times. He retired in 2009 with the Oakland Athletics.

Jason Giambi made his MLB debut with the Oakland Athletics in 1995. He spent the majority of the 2000s with the New York Yankees and retired from the Cleveland Indians in 2014. A five-time All-Star, Giambi was a two-time Silver Slugger Award winner.

Despite allegations of using performance-enhancing drugs, Sammy Sosa became the fifth slugger in MLB history to hit 600 career home runs. After 18 seasons in the MLB, he finished his career with 609 home runs and a batting average of .273. He was the NL home run leader in 2000 and 2002.

Did you know that Craig Biggio is the only player to have been named an All-Star as both a catcher and second baseman? After playing his entire career with the Astros, he retired in 2007 with a batting average of .218 and 414 stolen bases. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

"Billy the Kid," William Edward Wagner, was born right-handed but learned how to throw left-handed after two arm injuries in his youth. He is the current record holder for the highest percentage of strikeouts per innings pitched in MLB history. He retired in 2010 with 422 saves and 1,196 strikeouts.

Omar Vizquel played 24 seasons in the MLB, beginning in 1989 and ending in 2012. Throughout his career, he played for the Mariners, Indians, Giants, Rangers, White Sox and Blue Jays. His 10-year successful stint with the Indians from 1994-2004 landed him a spot in the Cleveland Indians Hall of Fame.

Mike Piazza kicked off his career by playing six years with the Los Angeles Dodgers. He landed with the New York Mets in 1998 and helped lead them to the World Series. Although he never won the World Series, he earned 12 All-Star honors, 10 Silver Sluggers and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

The New York Mets drafted Jason Isringhausen in the 44th round of the 1991 draft. He made his pitching debut on July 17, 1995, and spent much of the 2000s with the St. Louis Cardinals. He was the NL saves leader in 2004 and was inducted into the Cardinals Hall of Fame when he retired.

Greg Maddux holds the MLB record for most Gold Glove awards. He received the honor consecutively from 1990-2002 and again from 2004-2008 for a total of 18. Throughout his 22-season career, he recorded 3,371 strikeouts and a win-loss record of 355-227.

Johnny Damon played with seven different teams throughout his MLB career highlighted by his time in Boston and New York. After helping the Red Sox win the World Series in 2004, he was traded to the Yankees where he won his second World Series championship. He retired in 2012 with 408 stolen bases.

Francisco Rodriguez, a six-time All-Star, is a two-time AL Rolaids Relief Man Award winner. He is also one of only a few pitchers to record more than 400 saves in his pitching career. In fact, Rodriguez was the AL saves leader for three years in the 2000s: 2005, 2006 and 2008.

Edgar Martinez not only spent his entire playing career with the Seattle Mariners, he also served as their hitting coach from 2015-2018. During his time as a player, he made more than 5,000 plate appearances, had 2,247 hits and earned five Silver Slugger awards.

Though he could have played baseball at the University of Arkansas, Hunter became a first-round pick out of high school in 1993. His debut with the Twins came in 1997 and he went on to earn more Gold Glove Awards than any other outfielder. He retired in 2015 with 2,452 hits, including 353 home runs.

Born in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, Carlos Delgado hit more home runs than any other Puerto Rican player in the MLB. Though he played with the Marlins and Mets, he spent 11 successful seasons with the Blue Jays and in 2015, he was inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame.

Once named Mr. Baseball Indiana, Scott Rolen was the 1997 NL Rookie of the Year. He went on to win eight Gold Glove Awards and had seven All-Star selections throughout his career, topping it off with a World Series championship in 2006. He retired in 2012 with a batting average of .281 and 316 homers.

Throughout the 2000s, Gary Sheffield played for five different teams, including the Dodgers, Braves, Yankees, Tigers and Mets. A member of the 500 home run club, he recorded eight seasons with 30 or more home runs. After playing his last game in 2009, Sheffield now works as a sports agent.

Jimmy Rollins was drafted by the Phillies in 1996 and made his debut in 2000. He spent the next 14 years with the team and later played short stints with the Dodgers and White Sox. Once the NL stolen base leader, Rollins retired in 2016 with one World Series victory and a batting average of .264.

Bret Boone played second base with the Mariners, Reds, Braves, Padres and Twins, though his time with the Mariners was most rewarding. Between 1998-2004, he won four Gold Glove Awards, two Silver Slugger Awards and was the 2001 AL RBI leader. He retired in 2005 with 1,021 career RBIs.

Drafted by the New York Yankees in 1990, Andy Petitte made his MLB debut in 1995. After five World Series championships, he pitched his last game on September 28, 2013. Did you know that Petitte won more games than any other pitcher in the 2000s? His No. 46 was retired by the Yankees.

Varitek was a switch hitter but threw right. He played his entire career behind home plate with the Boston Red Sox from 1997-2011. During those years, he earned three All-Star selections and two World Series championships. A Gold Glove and Silver Slugger winner, he was also captain of his team.

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