Can You Identify These ’90s MLB All-Stars?

By: Daniel Yetman
Image: Wiki Commons by SD Dirk

About This Quiz

When you think of baseball in the 1990s, what's the first thing that comes to mind? For some of us, it might be the legacy of the Yankees. Maybe you remember the home run chase that went down to the wire in 1998 (which would later come out to be the beginnings of the Steroid Era).

Who can forget Michael Jordan's hiatus from basketball to try his hand at baseball and fulfill his late father's dream? Another storyline that the world was following was The Iron Man's, Cal Ripken's, remarkable consecutive game streak where he broke Lou Gehrig's record with 2,632 consecutive games played.

The 1990s was undoubtedly a hitters' era. In 1994, Tony Gwynn made the last close attempt at breaking a .400 batting average. When the season ended with a strike on August 11, Gwynn was carrying a .394 batting average. Would he have broken .400? We can only speculate. However, nobody since then has broken .390 in a full-length major league season.  

Believe it or not, the 1990s were the new 1980s. It was an era before stars like Mike Trout, Ichiro Suzuki and Albert Pujols were around. How well do you think you remember the 1990s? Give this quiz a go if you're ready for a trip down memory lane. 



Ken Griffey Jr. was a five-tool player (speed, power, hitting for average, fielding and arm strength) who left an impact on the league in a big way. When he was elected into the Hall of Fame in 2016, he broke the record for the highest percentage of the ballot vote, with 99.3% of voters electing him in.

Most people know Barry Bonds for breaking the all-time home run record and single season home run record in the 2000s. However, he was a star long before then. Barry Bonds won the National League MVP award in 1990, 1992 and 1993.

Frank Thomas hit 301 of his career 521 home runs with the White Sox in the 1990s. In 2014, he was voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. He is a two time winner of the AL MVP award, including in 1994 when he slugged an insane 1.217 OPS.

Mike Piazza had a career batting average of .308, highlighted by 12 All-Star selections. He also took home the Silver Slugger award for being the best hitter at his position 10 times.

Palmeiro made four All-Star teams during his career. He was born in Havana before going to school in America. There are only five other players (at the time of this writing) who have over 3,000 hits and 500 home runs.

Edgar Martinez is one of the newest members of the Hall of Fame after being elected in 2019. He had a career .312 batting average with 309 home runs. He's also one of the rare players to spend his entire career with one team.

Big Mac hit a league record 70 home runs in 1998 before Barry Bonds went on to hit 73 in 2003. As amazing as McGwire's 1998 season was, it wasn't even clear that he would lead the league in home runs until near the end of the season. Sammy Sosa chased him with 66 big flys.

Derek Jeter was imperative to the Yankees' success in the 1990s. During his career, Jeter had 3,000 hits, ranked sixth in MLB history in career hits and No 1 among shortstops.

Tony Gwynn almost became the first player since Ted Williams in 1941 to hit .400. Even though he fell a few points shy, he still had a spectacular career spanning about 20 seasons.

Cal Ripkin Jr. holds one of the toughest MLB records to break. He played 2,632 games in a row without taking a day off, breaking Lou Gehrig's record that lasted 56 years. And did we mention that he was also a 19-time All-Star?

Joe Carter will always be a legend in Toronto after hitting a walk-off home run in the final game of the 1993 World Series against the Atlanta Braves. He was also a five-time​ All-Star who hit 396 home runs over his career.

Jose Canseco has openly admitted to taking performance-enhancing drugs during his career in his book, 'Juiced.' In the book, he also states that most players​ were taking some type of performance-enhancing drug at the time.

Cecil Fielder played from 1985 to 1998. During this time, he hit 319 home runs and was selected for three All-Star teams. He won the World Series in 1996 as a member of the New York Yankees.

Jim Thome came into the league in 1991. In 1996, he hit over 30 home runs for the first time. The next time he would hit fewer than 30 home runs was during an injury-shortened 2005 season. After that, he wouldn't hit fewer than 30 home runs in a season until 2009.

Ron Gant is a member of the 30-30 club, meaning he is one of the few players to hit 30 home runs and steal 30 bases in the same year. He did it twice with the Atlanta Braves, in the 1990 and 1991 seasons.

Like Ron Gant, Ray Lankford was known for his speed and power. He stole more than 30 bases and hit more than 30 home runs, but never in the same season. He played 13 of his 15 years in the bigs in St. Louis.

Chipper Jones was one of the most consistent players in the league throughout the 1990s and 2000s. He was voted to eight All-Star teams throughout his career and took home the NL MVP award in 1999.

Manny Ramirez was one of the best hitters to ever play the game, amassing over 500 homers in his career. However, he might be best remembered for his humorous on-field antics, including disappearing inside the 'Green Monster' during a game.

David Justice was a three-time All-Star in the 1990s (1993, 1994, 1997). In 2000, he won the ALCS MVP as a member of the Yankees and they went on to win the World Series. He also won the World Series in 1995 with the Atlanta Braves.

Matt Williams played in the league from 1987 to 2003. He was a five-time All-Star in the 1990s and also won four Gold Gloves at the hot corner. He won one World Series in his career, in 2001 with the Diamondbacks.

The Big Cat played for eight teams over his career. He had his longest stints with the Expos from 1985-1991 and Colorado from 1993-1997. He was voted an All-Star five times, including three times in the 1990s.

Ellis Burks was voted an All-Star in 1990 and 1996. Over his career that spanned from 1987 to 2004, he hit .291 with 352 home runs. He also took home a Gold Glove award for his outfield defence and is a member of the Boston Hall of Fame.

Vlad was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2018. He a nine-time All-Star who began his career with the Expos in 1996. He's one of the greatest hitters of his generation, hitting a career 449 home runs with a .318 batting average.

Jim Edmonds was known for his spectacular defense. He took home his first Gold Glove in 1997 and followed it with a string of seven Gold Gloves over the next eight years. He's also a member of the Cardinals Hall of Fame.

Jeff Kent debuted in the league in 1992 with the Blue Jays. He went on to become the all-time leader in home runs among second basemen with 377. He also sports a career .290 average over his 17 seasons.

Delino DeShields was a speedy second baseman who played for five teams over his 13-year career. He stole a total of 463 bases. In 1991, he stole a career high 56 bases with the Montreal Expos.

Shawn Green is a two-time All-Star who is tied for the most home runs in a game record. Against the Brewers in 2002, he hit four home runs and a double to collect a record 18 bases. He also won a Gold Glove in 1999 as a right fielder.

Brian Jordan played briefly with the Buffalo Bills and Atlanta Falcons before starting his MLB career with the Cardinals in 1992. He was voted an All-Star for the first time in 1999, a season where he hit .283 with 23 home runs and 115 RBIs.

Julio Franco started his career in 1982 with the Phillies. He continued to play in the league until 2007, minus two stints in Japan and one in Korea. He may have aged better than any player in MLB history. In his age 46 season, he still posted a .799 OPS.

Luis Gonzalez began his career with the Astros but found the most success with the Diamondbacks. In his first season with the Diamondbacks in 1999, he hit a career-high .336 and was voted to his first All-Star team.

Tim Raines made seven All-Star teams in his career. He swiped more than 70 bags six seasons in a row. He also was a member of the 1996 and 1998 Yankees World Series teams. He won another World Series as a coach in 2005 with the White Sox.

Albert Belle cranked well over 300 home runs throughout the 1990s. His top season came in 1995 when he hit 50 homers. He also accumulated a career .295 batting average. Belle was voted an All-Star in five straight seasons, from 1993 to 1997.

There's not much that Roberto Alomar didn't do during his time in the league. He had a career .300 batting average, socked 474 home runs, was voted an All-Star in 12 straight years, won the World Series twice and won the Gold Glove 10 times at second base.

A-Rod put up an impressive resume in his 22 years in the league. He was voted an All-Star 14 times and won the AL MVP three times. He has been at the center of controversy for his use of performance-enhancing drugs, which led him to serve a full year suspension in 2014

Kenny Lofton was known for his known primarily for his speed. He led the American League in stolen bases five years in a row, from 1992 to 1996. He played 10 years with Cleveland Indians and one season or less with 10 other teams.

Mo Vaughn was voted an All-Star in 1995, 1996 and 1998. He established himself as one of the best hitters in the American League for most of the 1990s. In 1995, his MVP season, he hit .300 with 39 home runs, 126 RBIs and a .963 OPS. The next season, he set a career high in RBIs with 143.

Barry Larkin played his entire career as the hometown boy with the Reds. Over his 18-year career, he accumulated 2,340 hits and swiped 379 bases. He also added an NL MVP award to his resume in 1995 and helped the Reds win a World Series title in 1990.

Gary Sheffield might have been best known for his consistency. The Florida native hit 509 home runs over his career and won five Silver Slugger awards. He hit a career high in home runs in 2000 with the Dodgers (43).

Juan Gonzalez played the majority of his career with the Texas Rangers. He led the AL in home runs twice, in 1992 and 1993. Over 16 years in the league, he slugged 434 home runs with a career .295 average. Not surprisingly, he was voted into the Rangers Hall of Fame.

Sammy Sosa hit 66 home runs in 1998. In almost any other year, he would have led the league. However, Mark McGwire went on to hit a record 70 home runs that year. Sosa also hit 63 home runs in 1999 and 64 in 2001.

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