99% of people can't name all of these boxers from an image. Can you?

SPORTS

Craig

7 Min Quiz

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About This Quiz

Boxing has been a fan favorite since ancient times and continues to thrill in today's live bouts and blockbuster movies. How well do you know the sport's real-life champs and ring legends? See if you can knock out this quiz.

Who is this boxer?

Evander Holyfield was an excellent heavyweight that won the WBC, IBF and WBA titles when he defeated Buster Douglas in 1990. He defended his titles against all comers including George Foreman and Larry Holmes and lost and reclaimed them on a few occasions. He is perhaps best remembered, however, as the boxer that lost part of his ear to a Mike Tyson bite. The pair had met once before, in 1996 with Holyfield stunning Tyson with an 11th round victory via TKO. In the rematch two years later, Tyson bit Holyfield's ear, not once, but twice. The second time, Tyson tore off a piece of the ear, spitting it to the floor. He was disqualified. Holyfield's career carried on right up until 2011 when he retired.

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Who is this boxer?

After winning heavyweight gold at the 1968 Olympics, George Foreman quickly established himself on the heavyweight scene. In 1973 he became the heavyweight champion by defeating Joe Frazier in two rounds. He defended the title twice before losing to Muhammad Ali in one of the most famous boxing matches in history, The "Rumble in the Jungle." He officially retired in 1977 but Foreman returned to the ring in the early 90s. In 1994, he defeated Michael Moorer to once again be world heavyweight champion. At 45 he was the oldest person to hold the title.

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Who is this boxer?

Muhammad Ali is considered as one of the greatest boxers of all time. Born Cassius Clay, Ali changed his name when he converted to Islam. He boasts an incredible record, winning 56 out of 61 matches, 37 of them by knockout. He also won an Olympic gold medal at the 1960 Rome Olympics, claiming the heavyweight division. Ali was involved in some classic fights, including the famous "Rumble in the Jungle" against George Foreman in 1974.

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Who is this boxer?

Named the "Fighter of the Decade" for his boxing prowess in the 1980s, Sugar Ray Leonard was extremely popular with the American public. Over the course of his career, he won five titles across five different weight divisions. Leonard was forced to retire in 1982 with a detached retina but made a comeback in 1984. This ended in a loss, at which point he again retired. A second comeback happened in 1987 and resulted in Leonard beating Marvin Hagler for the middleweight title. He then added two more in 1988 and retired again after defending his belts against Thomas Hearns and Roberto Duran. But the lure of the ring saw him come out of retirement once again, but without much success this time. Believe it or not, Leonard retired for the fourth time and returned again in 1997, but without success.

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Who is this boxer?

"Iron" Mike Tyson burst on the heavyweight boxing scene in the mid-1980s and immediately established himself as one of the most devastating punchers ever seen. In his first year of professional boxing, he quickly racked up a 15-0 record with all his wins coming by way of knockout. By the end of 1987, he was the IBF, WBC and WBA world boxing heavyweight champion. Tyson suffered his first defeat to the unheralded Buster Douglas in 1990. A range of personal problems, including a rape conviction for which he spent three years in prison, hampered his career, and Tyson was never the same boxer again. He eventually retired in 2005.

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Who is this boxer?

After winning Olympic gold in Seoul in 1998, Lennox Lewis turned pro in 1989. Within a year he had his first title, the EBU heavyweight belt. He followed that up with the WBC heavyweight belt in 1992 only to lose it to Oliver McCall after three defenses. Lewis waited patiently for a rematch, which came in 1997 where he reclaimed the belt. In 1999, Lewis met Evander Holyfield for a unification bout which ended in a draw. Another bout followed later in the year, with Lewis winning and claiming the IBF, WBA, and WBC world heavyweight titles. Lewis lost his titles to Hasim Rahman in 2001 but reclaimed them in a rematch later that year. He then fought a fading Mike Tyson as well as Vitali Klitschko before retiring in 2003.

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Who is this boxer on the left?

Hailing from the Philippines, Manny Pacquiao is regarded as one of the best pound for pound fighters ever seen. He started his professional career in 1995, aged just 16. Pacquiao has a number of records to his name including being the only eight-division world champion. He grew up extremely poor and was forced to sell bread for a living. Pacquiao would fight for money and soon realized that boxing could take him out of poverty. He has served in the Philippine House of Representatives.

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Who is this boxer?

After capturing lightweight gold at the Barcelona Olympics in 1992, Oscar De La Hoya turned pro. And what a career it turned out to be. De La Hoya ended with 10 titles across an incredible six weight divisions, including lightweight, light welterweight, welterweight, light middleweight and middleweight. Along the way, he defeated some of the greatest champions in boxing, including Hector Camacho, Julio Cesar Chavez and Pernell Whittaker. He retired in 2008.

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Who is this boxer?

Joe Frazier will always be remembered for his bout with Muhammad Ali in 1971. With Ali just returning to boxing at the time, both fighters were given an incredible $2.5 million to fight. The two boxers engaged in what is widely regarded as one of the greatest fights of all time with Frazier dropping Ali to the canvas in the 15th and final round only for Ali to return to his feet on the count of four. Frazier, nevertheless, won the fight on points. After defending his title on two occasions, Frazier then lost to George Foreman as well as a rematch to Ali. In 1974, the two fought for the third time. The "Thrilla in Manila" was another classic with the pair trading blows until the fourteenth round when Frazier's corner threw in the towel as his eyes had practically swollen shut. Frazier fought 37 times in his career, winning 32, with 27 of those victories coming by knockout.

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Who is this boxer?

After receiving his first pair of gloves at the age of seven, Floyd Mayweather, Jr. focused his attentions on boxing, first in the amateur ranks where he built up an impressive 84-6 record including a bronze medal at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics. After turning professional that same year, it didn't take long for Mayweather to win his first title, the WBC World super featherweight title in 1998. Mayweather has the spectacular career record of 49 fights without defeat, including 26 knockouts.

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Who is this boxer?

Roy Jones Jr's amateur career ended in controversy when he was only awarded the silver medal at the 1988 Olympic Games, after being the best boxer in the light middleweight division. Jones turned professional in 1989 and quickly showed himself as a formidable opponent. A first title followed in 1992 when he claimed the WBC Continental Americas super-middleweight champion. The IBF middleweight title followed in 1993 after he defeated Bernard Hopkins despite a broken hand. In 1994, Jones added the IBF middleweight title to his collection. In 1996, Jones moved up a division and won the WBC light-heavyweight title. Another weight division change saw him win the WBA heavyweight title in 2003. The following year, Jones tasted defeat for only the second time in his career, losing his IBO light heavyweight belt to Antonio Tarver.

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Who is the boxer on the right?

Born in 1912, Henry Armstrong is the only boxer to ever hold the featherweight, welterweight and lightweight championship belts at the same time. He secured this incredible feat during 1937, a year in which he fought 27 times, winning every bout with 26 victories coming by way of knockout. Without a doubt will be remembered as one of the greatest fighters of all time. He retired in 1945.

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Who is this boxer?

Floyd Patterson first announced himself to the world in 1952 when he won the middleweight gold medal at the Olympics in Helsinki. He moved up to the light heavyweight division at the start of his professional career and fought Archie Moore for the vacant world heavyweight title in 1956, winning easily by knockout. At 21 years old, he was the youngest ever champion. After four defenses, Patterson lost the title to Ingemar Johansson. Paterson was soon in the history books again when he became the first person to reclaim the heavyweight title. He was dethroned as heavyweight champion in 1962, losing to Sonny Liston in the first round. His career ended in 1972.

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Who is this boxer?

Pernell Whittaker, or "Sweet Pea" as he was affectionately known, captured a number of amateur titles, including Olympic gold and a world championship before turning pro in 1984. Whittaker claimed a number of titles over different weight divisions. Whittaker was known for his incredible hand speed and retired in 2001 with a record of 46 fights and 40 wins, including 17 knockouts.

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Who is this boxer?

The "Brown Bomber" Joe Louis is considered by many to be the greatest heavyweight of all time. After winning the world heavyweight title in 1937 from James J. Braddock, Louis defended it over the course of 11 years and 25 title defenses. Perhaps his most important defense was in 1938 against Max Schmeling, the poster boy of German boxing who was used extensively in Nazi propaganda. With the world on the brink of war, the bout took on a more significant meaning. Louis didn't disappoint. Although he had lost to Schmeling earlier in his career, he knocked the German out in the first round. His record speaks for itself: 69 fights, 66 wins with 52 coming by the way of knockout.

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Who is this boxer?

After a newspaper described him as "sweet as sugar," "Sugar" Ray Robinson's nickname stuck. Many consider him to be the best pound for pound boxer in the history of the sport and he fought across three decades. He was both the world welterweight and middleweight champion at various points in his career and was named "Fighter of the Year" in 1942 and 1951 by "Ring" magazine, almost a decade apart. Robinson had six bouts against Jack La Motta, winning five. La Motta is quoted as saying. "I fought Sugar Ray so often, I got diabetes." Robinson fought 200 times in his career with 175 wins, 110 of which came by way of knockout.

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Who is this boxer?

As the first African American man to win the world heavyweight championship, Jack Johnson's contribution to the sport of boxing is critical. Not only was he a fighter of note, but he had a personality to match, breaking down racial barriers that at the turn of the 20th century held back so many African Americans. It was through his tenacity that he was finally given a shot at the heavyweight crown in 1908, despite turning professional 11 years earlier. Traveling all the way to Australia, Johnson beat then-champion Tommy Burns by TKO. He defended his title on numerous occasions, even in Europe after fleeing the U.S. to escape a criminal conviction. He eventually returned to the States, served 8 months jail time and retired in 1928.

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Who is the boxer on the right?

Larry Holmes was an excellent heavyweight, defending his WBC world championship belt on no less than 17 occasions. Holmes turned professional in 1973 and spent a lot of time sparring with two boxing legends, Joe Frazier and Muhammad Ali. He gave up his WBC belt to take up the newly formed IBF's heavyweight title. He defended this title three times before losing to Michael Spinks. After a rematch which he again lost, Holmes walked away from the ring forever with a record of 75 fights and 69 wins, 44 coming by way of knockout.

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Who is this boxer?

"The Hitman," as he was known, Thomas Hearns started his professional career in 1977. Hearns won his first belt in 1980 by beating Pipino Cuevas to claim the WBA welterweight title. He fought some of the best fighters around in the early '80s including Sugar Ray Leonard and Roberto Duran. It was his battle in 1985 with Marvelous Marvin Hagler that is considered one of the most action-filled boxing matches ever. Although Hearns lost in three rounds, he continued to excel and in 1987 became the first man to win a title in four different divisions when he beat Juan Roldan to claim the WBC middleweight crown. Two further belts followed, with Hearns only retiring in 2006.

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Who is the boxer on the right?

With a boxing career that spanned five decades and titles across four weight divisions, Roberto Duran is certainly one of the most popular boxers to enter the ring. "Hands of Stone" was loved for his relentless style and always seemed to be on the attack. He won a range of titles as a lightweight, welterweight, and middleweight and fought some of the best boxers of the time, including Sugar Ray Leonard and Marvelous Marvin Hagler.

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Who is this boxer?

Max Schmeling had made a name for himself in his native Germany and realized that he needed to box in the United States to further his career. He arrived in the country and soon impressed those who saw him in action. In 1930, he was crowned world heavyweight champion after his opponent Jake Sharkey was disqualified for a low blow. Sharkey gained his revenge a few years later, taking the title off Schmeling on points. With the rise of the Nazis in Germany, Schmeling’s career was used as propaganda, especially his fight against Joe Louis in 1938. Schmeling lost but he and Louis became friends, with the German even helping Louis financially when he fell on hard times. When Louis died in 1981, Schmeling helped to pay for his funeral.

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Who is this boxer?

An unrelenting fighter, Jack Dempsey caught the imagination of the greater public. His style of all-out attack endured him to boxing fans. In fact, Dempsey had such a hard punch, he recorded two knockouts in under 20 seconds in his career. Of the 49 knockouts in his career, a staggering 25 came within the first round. Dempsey first won the heavyweight title in 1919 and held it through five defenses until 1926 when he lost it on points to Gene Tunney. Dempsey had a rematch a year later and lost again at which point he retired.

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Who is this boxer?

With a formidable left hook, Ruben Olivares scored 22 knockouts in his first 22 professional fights. Olivares won his first title in the Bantamweight class when he floored Lionel Rose in 1969. A host of other titles followed, including the WBA featherweight title in 1974 and the WBC featherweight crown in 1975. Unfortunately, his defense for both of these lasted just one match. He retired in 1981 with a record of 104 fights and 88 wins of which 78 were by the way of knockout.

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Who is this boxer?

After winning the middleweight belt in 1970 by beating Nino Benvenuti, Carlos Monzon defended his title an incredible 14 times ending 10 of those defenses by knockout. He retired undefeated and then spent time in prison for a murder conviction. He died in a car crash in 1985. He fought 100 times in his career, winning 87 of which 59 came by knockout.

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Who is this boxer?

Jake LaMotte could take a punch. In fact, it was often said he had a chin of granite, a fact recognized at the "Ring" magazine 75th-anniversary dinner. But the 'Bronx Bull' was not only about taking a punch, he could hand them out as well. LaMotta turned pro in 1941 and perhaps will be known for his series of bouts with Sugar Ray Robinson where he only won one in five. He finally was given a shot at the middleweight title in 1949, beating Marcel Cerdan for the crown. After a number of defenses, he lost his title to Sugar Ray Robinson in their last fight. LaMotte’s life was portrayed by Robert De Niro in the movie "Raging Bull."

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Who is this boxer?

Sam Langford fought across a range of weight divisions throughout his boxing career that spanned from 1902 till 1926. As a black boxer, his career was held back by racial discrimination, denying Langford the chance to fight for any championships. He fought 293 times, winning 167 and recording 117 knockouts. He was forced to retire due to the deterioration of his eyesight.

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Who is this boxer?

In 2013, Bernard Hopkins became the oldest fighter to win a world championship, at 48 years, 1 month and 22 days. Hopkins also holds numerous other records during his distinguished career including the longest run as world middleweight champion (10 years) and the most world middleweight title defenses (20). Hopkins fought and beat some of the best boxers in the world during his ongoing career, including Oscar De La Hoya, Felix Trinidad and Roy Jones Jr.

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Who is this boxer?

Ask any boxing fan about Rocky Marciano and probably the first thing to leave their mouth will be two numbers - 49-0. Marciano fought 49 times and never tasted defeat, making him the first boxing champion to leave the ring without a loss against his name. After turning pro in 1947, Marciano quickly establish himself as a powerful fighter that could take a punch. In 1952, Marciano got a shot at the heavyweight title and despite a first round visit to the canvas, beat Walcott in the 13th round via knockout. He defended his crown six times before a bad back forced him to retire. He died in 1969 in a plane crash.

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Who is this boxer?

Liston turned pro in 1953 after learning much of his boxing while in prison. By 1962, he was the heavyweight champion of the world, defeating Floyd Patterson by knocking him out in the first round. Liston lost his title to a certain Cassius Clay. In a rematch, Clay, now renamed Muhammad Ali, beat Liston in the first round. He retired in 1970 and died of a drug overdose that same year.

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Who is this boxer?

It took a long time for Marvelous Marvin Hagler to get a title shot in the 1970s, but not through any fault on his part. Hagler was willing to fight some of the most difficult opponents in the middleweight division, and usually on their terms. He eventually did get a title shot in 1979 against Vito Antuofermo, a match that ended in a draw. A year later he had a second chance, this time facing Alan Minter. A knockout saw Hagler claim the belt and this led to an incredible run of 12 title defenses. Hagler saw off some of the best boxers of the era including Antuofermo, Roberto Duran, and Thomas Hearns. He lost the belt in 1987 to Sugar Ray Leonard and since he was not afforded a rematch, he retired.

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Who is the boxer on the right?

Joey Maxim may not have had the power of other boxers in the 1940s and '50s, but his boxing craft in the ring was second to none. He won the world light heavyweight crown from Freddie Mills in 1950. In 1952 he defended his title against the legendary Sugar Ray Robinson. In the grueling heat, the two fighters went at it hammer and tongs. Eventually, Robinson, so fatigued by the heat and the fight itself, could not come out for the 14th round, despite leading on points. Maxim lost the title to Archie Moore in 1952 and despite an attempt to regain it, Moore held onto the belt.

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Who is this boxer?

"The Hawk" Aaron Pryor claimed the WBA junior welterweight title in 1980, beating Antonio Cervantes despite hitting the canvas in the first round. Fights against Roberto Duran and Sugar Ray Leonard fell through because Pryor wanted more of the purse. Pryor then had two epic encounters against Alexis Arguello, winning both. He retired from boxing straight after the second match although he tried to make a few ill-fated comebacks until eye problems stopped his career for good in 1990.

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Who is this boxer?

With his frail looks and pale skin, Jimmy Wilde was often called 'The Ghost with the Hammer in his Hand." Wilde claimed to have fought over 800 bouts in his lifetime, but this is thought to be greatly exaggerated. What is known is that for his first 98 fights, he was unbeaten, a record for any professional boxer. Fighting as a flyweight, Wilde had incredible power, often knocking out opponents with ease. His final official record stands at 142 fights, 132 wins with 99 coming by way of knockout.

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Who is this boxer?

A boxer that had the ability to dodge punches, Willie Pep was given the nickname of "Will o' the Wisp," thanks to his evasive abilities. After turning pro in 1940, Pep won his first 63 fights including the featherweight title in 1942. He kept the belt until 1948 when he lost to Sandy Saddler. A rematch followed and Pep regained his title only to lose it to Saddler again in 1950. They met one more time in 1951 with Saddler winning again to take a 3-2 record over Pep. After retirement in 1959 Pep, like some many others returned to the ring in 1965 but finally retired for good the following year.

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Who is this boxer?

With only one defeat in his career as a professional boxer, Gene Tunney's record certainly stands up to all the other greats in the sport of boxing. Tunney was crowned heavyweight champion in 1926, after defeating Jack Dempsey. He defended his crown the following year, beating Dempsey under controversial circumstances. In what became known as the "battle of the long count," Tunney received an advantage from the referee who, after Tunney was knocked down, refused to start the count until Dempsey had returned to his corner. Tunney was one of the first boxers to really study his opponents before each match. He retired as the heavyweight champion of the world.

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Who is this boxer?

With a boxing career spanning 27 years, Archie Moore is the undisputed knock-out king of the sport. He ended more fights by knockout - 141 - than any other boxer in history. Moore started his career in 1936 and fought an incredible 219 times, winning 184 bouts. Moore never won the heavyweight crown but defended his light-heavyweight title nine times.

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Who is this boxer?

As a boxer known for throwing punches from anywhere, Harry Greb quickly was given the nickname "The Human Windmill." Greb was at a disadvantage in all his fights, however, as he only had one eye. This might be the reason that he boxed a little below the belt, adding a few elbows and head-butts where he could. Although he was a middleweight, Greb would fight all comers and is the only man to have ever beaten Gene Tunney. He won numerous titles during the course of his career.

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Who is this boxer?

Joe Calzaghe, a Welsh boxer fighting in the super middleweight and light heavyweight division is one of only a handful of boxers never to have been defeated. He boasts a record of 46 fights with 46 wins, 32 coming by way of knockout. Calazghe first fought in 1993 with his career spanning 15 years. In that time he defended his super middleweight title on 21 occasions. Calzaghe fought against a number of talented boxers including Roy Jones Jr. and Chris Eubank.

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Who is this boxer?

Jimmy McLarnin turned professional in 1923 and fought across a range of weight divisions. He was willing to box anyone, as can be seen in the fact that in his 77-bout career, he fought no less than 15 world champions. McLarnin claimed the welterweight title in 1933 after knocking out Young Corbet III in the first round. His reign was brief, losing the belt to Barney Ross in 1934. But Jimmy was not done and in a rematch, he reclaimed the crown only to lose it again to Ross in 1935. He retired in 1936 with a record of 77 fights, 62 wins including 21 knockouts.

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Who is this boxer?

After turning professional in 1980, Julio Cesar Chavez built up an impressive record of 43 wins and 0 losses before he was afforded the chance to challenge for the WBC super featherweight title. He has the longest undefeated streak, at 13 years. Chavez also held the WBA lightweight title, the WBC lightweight title, the WBC light welterweight title and the IBF light welterweight title and at the time was considered the best pound for pound boxer on the planet, especially after and impressive record of 89 fights, 88 wins, and 1 draw. He holds the record for the most title fights, at 37.

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Who is this boxer?

Joe Gans was an extremely technical boxer, taking the time to study his opponents before setting foot in the ring with them. This was almost unheard of in the early era of boxing. After losing a lightweight title shot over twelve rounds to Frank Erne in 1900, Gans won a rematch a few years later, knocking Erne down in the first round. He also had three memorable fights against Battling Nelson. The first Gans one thanks to a Nelson disqualification for a low blow. In the second, Nelson claimed victory by knocking out Gans and in the third, Nelson won easily with Gans struggling from the effects of tuberculosis, a disease that would lead to his death in 1910.

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Who is this boxer?

Blessed with both skill and packing a punch, Benny Leonard is one of the greatest lightweight boxers ever to enter the ring. After turning pro at the age of just 15 in 1911, Leonard went on to fight 100 times, winning 89 with 70 knockouts, an incredible amount for a lightweight. He became the lightweight champion in 1917 and kept his title for the next six years. He retired in 1925 but was forced back into the ring in 1931 due to financial problems, finally quitting boxing for good a year later.

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